Be Smart in the Sun – During UV Safety Awareness Month [5 Tips to Limit UV Exposure]

July is UV Safety Awareness Month, but it is important to remember skin protection throughout the entirety of the year. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), ultra-violet (UV) radiation exposure is the root cause of most skin cancers.

According to the FDA, skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Current estimates are that 1 in 5 Americans are at risk of developing skin cancer in their lifetime. Exposure to natural and artificial ultraviolet (UV) light has a direct impact on a person’s risk of developing skin cancer — despite age, or skin type. 

beach-blue-female-33622-768x515 Be Smart in the Sun - During UV Safety Awareness Month [5 Tips to Limit UV Exposure]

Here are some tips to help you be smart, while exposed to UV light of the sun during July and all s-ummer months.

1. Make efforts to wear protective clothing and seek shade

Try to not expose your body to direct sunlight. Wearing light clothing, which covers your body, or staying in the shade is the way to go. If possible, wear sunglasses, even if you think you are protected by the shade of trees.

2. Use checked and approved UV protection products

Make sure that the products you use deliver their advertised benefits. The products you use must be effective at guarding you from harmful UV radiation and safe to use on you and your family.

For instance, the FDA issued many warnings against advertised marketing products, such as Advanced Skin Brightening FormulaSunsafe RxSolaricare and Sunergetic. The statement is that they put people’s health at risk by giving consumers a false sense of security that a dietary supplement could prevent sunburn, reduce early skin aging caused by the sun, or protect from the risks of skin cancer. 

3. Use safe sunscreen products

Choose broad spectrum sunscreen products with SPF 15, or higher. If you plan to immerse your body in water while exposed to sun, make sure that your sunscreen is water resistant.

The products you use should have one of the two ingredients: zinc oxide or titanium dioxide, which according to the FDA are safe and effective. On the other hand, two other used ingredients: aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and trolamine salicylate are proposed as not safe and effective for sunscreen use. All other ingredients currently used for sunscreen products don’t have enough data yet to be proposed as safe.

orthopaedic-clinic Be Smart in the Sun - During UV Safety Awareness Month [5 Tips to Limit UV Exposure]

Reapply sunscreen at least every two hours, and more often if you’re sweating, or jumping in and out of the water. Ask a healthcare professional before applying sunscreen to infants younger than 6 months.

4. Limit your sun exposure

Limit time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when the sun’s rays are most intense. Remember that your children, and especially infants, have more delicate and thin skin than yours, so even when you feel the sun doesn’t affect you, they are at risk of serious sunburns.

We have prepared these tips for you because we care about your general health, not only your orthopedic needs. Our goal is to share our knowledge, so that you and your family stay safe and healthy. 

Orthopedic Clinic in Raleigh, Holly Springs, Garner and Cary

Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic’s Board Certified orthopedic doctors in Raleigh, have many years of experience with diagnosis and treatment of even the most complex orthopedic conditions affecting patients of all ages. Our surgeons and their teams in the Orthopedic Clinic in Raleigh, Holly Springs, Garner and Cary provide patients with conservative treatment options, performing in-office procedures, if necessary.

Make an appointment with your surgeons in Raleigh (or our other locations) to benefit from our specialized treatment with a personal approach.

 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.