6 COMMON SKI AND SNOWBOARD INJURIES OF THE FEET AND ANKLES (AND HOW TO AVOID THEM) – PART 2

In Part 1 of this guide, we presented 3 common ski and snowboard injuries, which can affect our feet and ankles. We also explained what may cause them and how to avoid them. Read Part 1 also, if you want to find out what causes skiing and snowboarding injuries in general.

The injuries we are going to describe in Part 2 are not less common or less important. In fact, make sure you read on, as in this list we will give you advice on how to avoid even more ski and snowboard injuries.

COMMON TYPES OF FEET AND ANKLE SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING INJURIES CONTINUED

4. Morton’s Neuroma

Many skiers and snowboarders experience Morton’s neuroma. It is a foot issue resulting from  excessive nerve inflammation under the ball of the foot. The nerve between the third and fourth metatarsals can get pinched if you wear ill-adjusted ski.

If pain continues or worsens, loosen your ski boots to decrease the pressure on the nerve. If this doesn’t help, you should see a board certified foot doctor in Cary for treatment.

How to avoid Morton’s neuroma?

To avoid Morton’s neuroma wear ski boots with a wide toe area to avert compression. It’s also a good idea to stretch your toes repeatedly before skiing. Morton’s neuroma is more predominant among women than men.

ING_19005_00173-1024x681 6 COMMON SKI AND SNOWBOARD INJURIES OF THE FEET AND ANKLES (AND HOW TO AVOID THEM) - PART 2

5. Ankle or foot fractures

The ankle or foot can break when there is excessive pressure placed on a bone. It can be caused by landing inaccurately after a jump, falling or colliding with another skier or snowboarder. When you fracture your foot or ankle, you should immediately treat it to prevent complications and to ensure that it heals safely and rapidly under supervision of a board certified podiatrist.

How to avoid ankle or foot fractures?

While it’s difficult to avoid fractures, you can make sure you stretch and strengthen your lower extremities in order to prepare them for the stress of snow sports. Preparation is the key.

6. Metatarsalgia

Metatarsalgia is a medical term describing pain and inflammation in the forefoot. It is a  common discomfort experienced by many skiers and snowboarders. Metatarsalgia is a common overuse injury. Numbness, a burning sensation or just general aches and pains may spoil the winter sports fun.

How to avoid metatarsalgia?

Poor pressure distribution is the main reason for this condition, so the most important thing you can do for your feet is get well fitted boots every time you plan to go skiing or snowboarding.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I SUSTAIN A FOOT OR ANKLE INJURY FROM SKIING OR SNOWBOARDING?

See a foot doctor in Cary, at Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic if:

  • You heard a “pop” sound at the time of injury.
  • The pain in your ankle or foot was instant and the swelling did not subside within the first few days.
  • You have continued instability in the ankle even when you are back to walking.

In the time following your injury, you may be unsure if what you feel is indeed a problem that needs a podiatrist’s attention. Try to remember that some injuries are not immediately recognized – they can flare up even after several days. The sooner you see a foot doctor in Cary, the sooner your condition can be treated and further damage can be avoided.

The board certified, fellowship trained podiatrists at Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic bring together many years of experience to diagnose and treat even the most complex foot and ankle conditions for patients of all ages.

At Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic our foot doctors and staff are recognized as leaders and innovators in the field of orthopaedics. Our foot and ankle surgeons regularly develop content designed to educate our patients with high-quality orthopedic knowledge sources.

Make an appointment with your foot doctor in Cary today to get specialized treatment with a personal approach.

The Raleigh Orthopaedic Clinic Cary Office offers same-day access for a variety of urgent orthopaedic conditions and recent injuries for patients of all ages, including: sprains and strains, broken bones/fractures, minor dislocations and sports-related injuries.

*Please note: Our new Cary office is opening February 4, 2019. .

New address: 115 Kildaire Park Drive, Suite 102 Cary, NC 27518

 

Sources: https://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/STOP/STOP/Prevent_Injuries/Skiing_and_Snowboarding_Injury_Prevention.aspx

https://www.childinjurypreventionalliance.org/skiing-snowboarding-safety/

 

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.